Southeast Georgia

This next trip will lead me on a 14-day tour of eastern Alabama, western Georgia and a slice of Tennessee.

Today I start as usual from my home base in West-Central Florida and drive several hundred miles north into the state of Georgia.

Presidential Flavor

Most of the remainder of this first day, I will spend in a little town called Plains. Well-known for its peanuts, this little, sleepy town was made famous by Jimmy Carter, the 39th President of the United States.

It seems that all of Plains is centered around this same theme. The local industry continues to be focused on peanuts, with a processing plant next to the town center.

The center is dominated by a few local stores and the Rosalynn Carter Butterfly Trail and the former train depot/Jimmy Carter For President Campaign Headquarters.

The Butterfly trail creates a well-maintained center of town, but most interesting is the former train depot, which was used as the campaign headquarters for his presidential race.

Just a 0.25 mile north, the Jimmy Carter National Historical Site is located in the former Plains High School building. I attempted a visit, but with temperatures in the 100s and a lack of a shaded parking spot. I preferred to skip this in favor of my dog companion Joey.

Another part of the Jimmy Carter NHS is the Carter family farm, which is located only 2 miles outside of town. With plenty parking and few other visitors, I had the place to myself.

Upon entering, you’re first faced with an outhouse, which was apparently still so prevalent locally at that time. The compound has surprisingly many buildings; most were accessible and even Joey was welcome.

Beside the main house, there are a small blacksmith shed, stables and a store. Some of the land continues to be planted with local crops that then are donated.

My short stay here, showed to me, how his personality and lifestyle still permeates the character of this town.

Boondocking

It was already late in the day when I left. The next destination would have to wait for another time, instead I continued to my planned campsite.

Many small parks in rural America allow primitive camping, often at pretty, but remote locations. One such park is Root Creek Park which is part of the Eufaula NWR.

Located on both sides of the Alabama/Georgia border, but separated by the Chattahoochee river. With view of the estuary and some local alligators as invited guests, I spent the evening cooling down and testing out my new VanLife built-in desktop computer setup.

VanLife Computer

I previously created a permanent power setup for the desktop computer, which consisted of a 12V to 19V converter with a relatively higher amperage rating for the additional monitor, a wall switch plus 30A relay and a wall power outlet. All connected to the house battery bank.

The computer that I use is a complete desktop substitute with a minimal size, connected directly to the 12V system. No 110V inverter needed. The mini format Asus PN51 was chosen for its support of one USB-C cable that supplies both power AND signal to a monitor.

The ultralight and thin screen is a 17.3″ Uperfect portable monitor with the same USB-C qualifications. The monitor mount has two separate wall brackets, installed on the side of the storage closet, so the computer can be used with the desk seat on top of the lower cabinets, or viewed from the bed.

The other bracket goes on the side of the lower cabinets, where the monitor can be viewed, either from the passenger seat or when sitting outside the van.

The computer setup is completed with a wireless keyboard and mouse.

Materials

Locations

  • Coca-Cola Road Sign ➜ 32.0333,-84.3923
  • Rosalynn Carter Butterfly Trail ➜ 32.0335,-84.3934
  • Jimmy Carter Campaign Headquarters/Train Depot ➜ 32.0333,-84.3942
  • Jimmy Carter Home Farm ➜ 32.0262,-84.4330
  • Jimmy Carter National Historic Site ➜ 32.0365,-84.3926
  • Rood Creek Park free campsite ➜ 32.0252,-85.0364

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